Eternally Warm-Hearted

On March 1, 1872, Yellowstone became the first national park for all to enjoy the unique hydrothermal and geologic wonders. Magma is close to the surface in Yellowstone. Magma plumes carry heat from deep in the earth to the surface and create “hot spot” volcanism. Read More

 
 
Basalt columns form the edge of a cliff in a snow-covered landscape.

Volcano

At the heart of Yellowstone is a large volcano.

Two skiers explore the mountains of Yellowstone.

Ski & Snowshoe

Make tracks in a winter wonderland.

 

Visit Yellowstone

An amazing experience awaits you here. Yellowstone is a seasonal park, so plan your visit by learning about the current conditions, operating seasons and hours, road conditions, lodging and eating options, and available activities.

 
People walk along a boardwalk that goes through the a bare landscape covered in parts by water.

Things To Do

Explore all the different things there are to do in the park.

View from the top of a building shows visitors standing in a wide arc around a steaming geyser.

Webcams

Watch Old Faithful erupt or see the Upper Geyser Basin, Mount Washburn, Yellowstone Lake, and some of the park entrances.

A car drives along on a winding road during a foggy morning.

Park Roads

Check the status and seasonal closing dates of park roads.

Snow blankets rolling hills and conifer trees grow along the ridges.

Play in the Snow

Winter is a magical time to explore Yellowstone by skis, snowshoes, snowmobile, or snowcoach.

A skier enjoys a winter sunrise at near a steaming geyser.

Explore in Winter

Ready to brave the cold? Check out this information for planning a winter visit.

 

Understand Yellowstone

Yellowstone is as wondrous as it is complex. The park is at the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, where nature and culture abound. Here are just a few highlights for you to learn about the park.

 
Bald eagle standing over a fish that it's eating.

Bald Eagle

Bald eagles can be seen along Yellowstone's many rivers and lakes.

A red fox staring across a snowy field.

Red Fox

Smallest of the three canid species found in the park.

A horseshoe covered in white rock reads

Collections

The Heritage and Research Center houses Yellowstone's extensive museum collection, archives, and research library.

A trail leads to a boulder on top of a hill with snow-capped mountains

Geology

A volcano, geysers and other thermal features, earthquakes, and glaciers shape Yellowstone's landscape.

A moose without antlers stands in the snow with willows and trees in the background.

Moose

Moose are the largest members of the deer family in Yellowstone.

 

Preserve Yellowstone

The National Park Service works to preserve Yellowstone for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of all people. We are not alone in this endeavor-park partners, volunteers, and visitors all help. Learn how to get involved.

 
People posing alongside an historic yellow park bus.

Partners

Learn how partners help support efforts to preserve and protect the park's spectacular natural and cultural features.

A park campground volunteer

Volunteer

Learn how you might be able to volunteer in Yellowstone National Park.

A group of bison cows and calves walking through a green meadow.

Bison Management

Review how the park maintains a wild, migratory bison population in a modern landscape.

Last updated: December 31, 2019

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

PO Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190-0168

Phone:

307-344-7381

Contact Us