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National Park Service Press Release
No Fooling – It’s Time to Get Snapping! The 2013 National Historic Landmark Photo Contest is Underway
For Immediate Release:
April 04, 2013
Contact(s):   Lisa Kolakowsky Smith, 215- 597-7946

Jane Cowley, 202-208-5839


No Fooling – It’s Time to Get Snapping! The 2013 National Historic Landmark Photo Contest is Underway

WASHINGTON – It is no joke that on April 1 the National Park Service launched the 14th annual National Historic Landmark Photo Contest. Grab your camera and join the excitement.

“National historic landmarks demonstrate the diverse history that can be seen all across this great nation,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “Wherever you may be, in a city or in the countryside, in a historic neighborhood or at the seashore, you are likely to encounter a landmark to photograph and share in the contest.”

There are over 2,500 national historic landmarks across the country from which to choose. They include an array of sites from the notable to the notorious. From Harriett Beecher Stowe’s House in Hartford, Connecticut to Alcatraz Prison in San Francisco Bay, from the Ford River Rouge Complex in Dearborn, Michigan to the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, national historic landmarks capture the diversity of the American story.

What will catch your eye and spark your imagination?  This year’s challenge theme is “My Observation.”  Let us know what you thought or describe what you saw on your visit.  Enter one photo per national historic landmark and up to 10 photo entries per photographer.

The contest is open through July 9 at midnight EDT.  For additional information and complete contest rules, visit the 2013 NHL Photo Contest page:   http://www.nps.gov/history/nhl/2013photocontest/ 

About National Historic Landmarks

National historic landmarks are nationally significant historic places designated by the Secretary of the Interior because they possess exceptional value or quality in illustrating or interpreting the heritage of the United States.  A National Historic Landmark may be a historic building, site, structure, object, or district.  Working with citizens throughout the nation, the National Historic Landmarks Program of the National Park Service (NPS) draws upon the expertise of NPS staff to identify and nominate new landmarks and to provide technical assistance to existing landmarks.

 For more information about the National Historic Landmarks Program, visit  http://www.nps.gov/history/nhl/

 

NPS

 

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America’s 401 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.




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