• Mount Rainier peeks through clouds, viewed across subalpine wildflowers and glacial moraine.

    Mount Rainier

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Nisqually to Paradise delays and Kautz Creek area closure.

    Road construction from the Nisqually Entrance to Longmire. Expect a 30-minute delay, Monday through Friday. Beginning May 29 to mid-July, all services at the Kautz Creek parking and picnic area are closed through the week. Limited parking on Sat & Sun. More »

  • Melting snow bridges and high streamflows create hazards for hikers, skiers, and snowshoers

    Be aware of hidden- and potentially fatal- hazards created by snow bridges and high streamflows on Mount Rainier. More »

Plan Your Visit

Five scenes of Mount Rainier National Park: old growth forest, a building in the historic district, a meadow in summer, the mountain at sunrise, and a temperate rainforest.
Five scenes of Mount Rainier National Park (left to right): old growth forest, a building in the historic district, a meadow in summer, the mountain at sunrise, and a temperate rainforest.
NPS Photos
 

Mount Rainier has five developed areas: Longmire, Paradise, Ohanapecosh, Sunrise, and Carbon/Mowich. Although the level of development in these areas ranges from basic -little more than a campground and picnic area- to extensive -hotel, restaurant, visitor center, campgrounds and picnic areas- each can serve as a base for exploring the rest of the park. Learn more about each of these areas:
Longmire
Paradise
Ohanapecosh
Sunrise
Carbon and Mowich




Be Prepared for the Weather
July and August are generally sunny and mild, with the chance of showers. The rest of the year is usually quite rainy, with heavy snowfall from November through April. Raingear is recommended year round. Trails are steep and well maintained in summer and snow covered and difficult to follow in winter. Check the weather for current conditions.




Have a Safe Trip
Mount Rainier, an active volcano, is a dynamic landscape. Review this safety information before you visit the park and practice the safety tips while you are at Mount Rainier.

Did You Know?

Gobblers Knob fire lookout.

In the early 1930s the Civilian Conservation Corp constructed fire lookouts throughout the park to help protect the surrounding area from fire. Four historic lookouts still remain in the Mount Rainier National Historic Landmark District including Tolmie, Shriner, Fremont, and Gobblers Knob.