From the Fields of Gettysburg

About This Blog

Posts on this blog are composed by employees of the National Park Service at Gettysburg National Military Park as well as park interns and guests. Our purpose is to highlight the stories of the battle and campaign, with features on those who were involved in the development and remembrance of the story of Gettysburg. The National Park Service is dedicated to protecting the resource and providing visitors with a full experience in appreciating our nation’s past and we hope you enjoy our blog.

Seeking Closure: Sarah Ruth's Effort to Discover What Happened to her Son Amos at Gettysburg

September 22, 2020 Posted by: Steven Semmel

Sarah Ruth never knew for certain what happened to her son, Amos, at Gettysburg. Her efforts to secure a pension opened anew the wounds and heartache of losing a son in battle. Like so many others, Amos Ruth was likely killed and buried as an unknown, though his family would never receive that closure they so desperately sought.

 

Breaking Down Boundaries: Women of the Civil War

August 26, 2020 Posted by: Molly Elspas

The Civil War was an unprecedented event in United States history that reached every corner of the country. Thousands of men lost their lives at Gettysburg in 1863 in a battle for freedom and unity; a battle whose after-effects still reach us today. Though the story of these men is one to be remembered, we often forget about the people they left behind.

 

South Central Pennsylvanians in the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

July 15, 2020 Posted by: John D. Hoptak

The first African American regiment to be raised in the North, east of the Mississippi River, the 54th Massachusetts ranks among the famous fighting units of the American Civil War. But did you know that when the 54th Massachusetts first departed Boston for the seat of war, there were more men from Pennsylvania within its ranks than from any other state? At least 124 of its soldiers were from south-central Pennsylvania, with two identifying Gettysburg as their place of birth

 

General George Meade's Forgotten Council of War

July 11, 2020 Posted by: Jon Tracey

The council of war held by General George Meade late on the night of July 2, 1863, is well known. But this was by no means Meade's only council. Although less known, he summoned his subordinates once more on July 4 to discuss the pursuit of the Confederate army. The consensus reached at this meeting generated much criticism of Meade. Read more about this forgotten council of war. . .

 
 

Last updated: August 5, 2020

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