Georgetown Civil War Walking Tour

Historical black and white photo of Officers at the door of Seminary Hospital in Georgetown, Washington, DC, during the Civil War.
Historical photo of Officers at the door of Seminary Hospital (formerly Georgetown Female Seminary) in Georgetown, Washington, DC, during the Civil War.

Library of Congress

 

The Civil War in Georgetown

The Civil War touched just about everyone who lived in the United States at that time. Whether it was wives who watched their husbands march off to war, or children who waited in vain for their fathers to come back. The Civil War stamped both people and places with its mix of bravery and cowardice, elation and sorrow, hatred and forgiveness.

In 1861 Georgetown was primarily considered a Southern town. Slavery was legal and 90% of the population was from south of the Mason-Dixon Line. After the fall of Fort Sumter, President Lincoln took quick steps to ensure Georgetown's southern aspirations would not be realized, especially considering its proximity to the Capitol.

With the arrival of northern troops, many of Georgetown's southern sympathizers, or "secesh", crossed over into Virginia. By July of 1861, many thought the first battle, about to be fought in Manassas, Virginia, would end the war. The citizens got caught up in the carnival atmosphere that arose around the battle. Merchants seized the opportunity by selling spyglasses, maps, and even canes that turned into chairs to the people that wanted to see the skirmish.

The realization set in that this was not going to be a quick war. The government turned several Georgetown houses and businesses into hospitals and morgues. Georgetowners were divided into Northern and Southern sympathizers. Each side lived in fear of retribution for its loyalties. The following tour will point out some of the sites involved in the famous clash between North and South.

Continue reading more about about the Civil War in Georgetown.

 
 

Walking Tour Stops Navigation

 
Exterior brick building in the city.
The Suntrust Bank at 2929 M St NW, the former grounds of the Union Hotel and Tavern in Georgetown, Washington, DC.

Screenshot from Google Maps

The Union Hotel and Tavern

Reference address: 2929 M St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: From the Visitor Center turn left onto 30th street. Take 30th Street a half block up to M Street. Cross M Street heading up 30th street. Pause on the corner across from the Bank.

 
Brick building with trees and brick sidewalk out front.
Front side building of Miss English's Seminary for Young Ladies.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Miss English's Seminary for Young Ladies

Reference address: 2929 N St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: Continue up 30th street until you reach N Street. Cross N Street. Look across 30th Street to the long white brick building.

 
White building with black shutters on 1300 30th St NW, Washington, DC.
Former home of Southern sympathizer, Dr. Grafton Tyler.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Former home of Dr. Grafton Tyler

Reference address: 1300 30th St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking address: While still on 30th St, look across at the building on 1300 30th St.

 
Row houses on the block of N St between 30th and 31st St.
Row houses on the block of N St between 30th and 31st St.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Homes of some of the most stubborn "secesh"

Reference address: 3017 N St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: Walk along the block of N St between the streets 30th and 31st St.
 
Front side of the building 3014 N St NW, Washington, DC.
Former home of Federal Judge James Dunlop.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Former home of Federal Judge James Dunlop

Reference address: 3014 N St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: Continue to the 3014 building on N St NW.

 
Front exterior of the brick building 3017 N St, Washington, DC.
Former home of Confederate sympathizer, William Redin.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Former home of William Redin

Reference address: 3017 N St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking address: Continue along N St to the 3017 building.

 
Front exterior of the buildings 3041 and 3045 N St, Washington, DC.
Front exterior of the buildings 3041 and 3045 N St, Washington, DC, formerly known as Wheatley Row.

Library of Congress

Wheatley Row

Reference address: 3041 N St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: Continue walking to the buildings 3041-3045 St NW.

 
Exterior of the Christ Episcopal Church building in the city.
Christ Episcopal Church in Georgetown, Washington, DC.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Christ Episcopal Church

Reference address: 3116 O St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: From Wheatley Row, walk towards 31st St NW. Walk along 31st St NW towards Dumbarton St NW. Cross Dumbarton St NW and continue walking along 31st St NW until you get to the corner of O St NW and 31st. You'll see the brick building of the church.

 
Gray building that is currently a department store known as the GAP.
Building, currently the department store, the GAP, is the former Forrest Hall during the Civil War.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Former Forrest Hall

Reference address: 1258 Wisconsin Ave NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: From the Christ Episcopal Church, walk back towards the intersection of 31st St NW and N St NW. Turn right onto N St NW and begin walking towards Wisconsin Ave. You'll see a gray building towards the left on Wisconsin Ave. It is currently the department store, the GAP. This is the former Forrest Hall.

 
Front exterior of the Dumbarton United Methodist Church.
Dumbarton United Methodist Church.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Dumbarton United Methodist Church

Reference address: 3133 Dumbarton St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: From the Forrest Hall building on the corner of Wisconsin Ave NW and N St NW, walk north towards Dumbarton St NW. Turn right onto Dumbarton St NW. After walking a few feet, look to your left for the church.

 
Front exterior of the former home of Union General George Henry Thomas.
Front exterior of the former home of Union General George Henry Thomas in Georgetown, Washington, DC.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Former home of Union General George Henry Thomas

Reference address: 3108 P St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: From Dumbarton United Methodist Church, continue walking along Dumbarton St NW towards 31st St NW. Turn left onto 31st St NW and continue north towards O St NW. Cross O St NW and continue walking north on 31st St NW towars P St NW. At the intersection of P St NW and 31st St NW, turn left onto P St NW. After walking a few feet, you'll find 3108 P St NW.

 
Scenic view of the front exterior of Tudor Place in Georgetown, Washington, DC.
Front exterior of Tudor Place.

Photo courtesy of the Tudor Place Historic House & Garden

Tudor Place

Reference address: 1644 31st St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: Walk back to the intersection of 31st St NW and P St NW. Continue north onto 31st St NW. Cross Q St NW until you see the gardens to your left. You'll find the entrance of Tudor Place at the black steel gates.
Tudorplace.org

 
Front exterior of the former Scott-Grant house in Georgetown, Washington, DC.
Front exterior of the former Scott-Grant building.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Scott-Grant House

Reference address: 3238 R St NW Washington, District of Columbia
Walking directions: From Tudor Place, continue walking north on 31st St NW towards R St NW. Turn left onto R St NW and continue walking west. Continue walking past 32nd St NW on R St NW. You'll see the large house and property of 3238 R St NW on the left.

 
Stone arch entrance to stone structure honoring those buried in Oak Hill Cemetery.
Stone arch entrance inside Oak Hill Cemetery.

Screenshot from Google Maps

Oak Hill Cemetery

Reference address: 3001 R St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Walking directions: From the Scott-Grant House, head east on R st NW toward 32nd St NW. Once you get close to 28th St NW, you'll see brick and steel gates for the entrance to the Oak Hill Cemetery.
The Oak Hill Cemetery – Washington, D.C. (oakhillcemeterydc.org)

Last updated: July 28, 2021

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