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    Yellowstone

    National Park ID,MT,WY

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Permits

Commercial Use Permits

Credit Card Payment Form

Permits for Other Activities

Special Use Permits (SUP)
General SUP Application (35 KB pdf)

Certain types of activities require a special use permit. These include many types of organized gatherings, distribution of printed material and other public expressions of opinion, and other activities that are controlled or prohibited. See the following definitions and examples to determine if your use might be included:

A special park use is defined as a short-term activity that takes place in a park area, and that:

1. provides a benefit to an individual, group or organization rather than the public at large;

2. requires written authorization and some degree of management control from the National Park Service (NPS) in order to protect park resources and the public interest;

3. is not prohibited by law or regulation;

4. is not initiated, sponsored, or conducted by the NPS; and is not managed under a concession contract, a recreation activity for which the NPS charges a fee, or a lease.

Examples include: weddings, other ceremonies, or public assemblies, etc. Examples of a First-Amendment Activity include: a church service, political event, or Freedom-of-Speech act.

For more information regarding Special Use Permits or to determine if your activity requires one, please call 307-344-2115 or email the park with the subject line "Attn: Special Use Permits."

Applications for permits should be submitted well in advance, preferably 2-3 months before event, for consideration and processing.

Pdf's can only be viewed or printed using Adobe Acrobat Reader (available free, online).


Did You Know?

Yellowstone Wolf.

There were no wolves in Yellowstone in 1994. The wolves that were reintroduced in 1995 and 1996 thrived and there are now over 300 of their descendents living in the Greater Yellowstone Area.